Prepare Ginger in This Old Way and Prevent Cancer, Treat Arthritis, and Reduce Cholesterol and Blood Sugar

Prepare Ginger in This Old Way and Prevent Cancer, Treat Arthritis, and Reduce Cholesterol and Blood Sugar Levels!

One of the most used and beneficial spices on the Planet is the well-known ginger. It has been used in the Asian and Indian cuisine f1or centuries.
This extraordinary spice has myriad of uses. It provides authentic and powerful effects on our health.
It has shown unique properties that are helpful in the treatment of cough, cold, flu, stomach ailments, and arthritis. Moreover, it offers great relief in case of back and muscle pain, as well as blood sugar and high cholesterol levels.

Great number of studies have confirmed that ginger is extremely helpful in the case of rheumatoid and degenerative arthritis, as well as in chronic pain.
Furthermore, it stimulates blood flow and prevents cancer development.
What’s more, researches have shown that ginger is 10,000 times stronger than chemotherapy, especially in case of breast cancer.
It contains the compound called 6-shogaol, which is more successful in targeting the breast cancer stem cells – the root cause of breast cancer malignancy.
The old ginger recipe we present you in this post, we help you deal with these and many more health problems and diseases.
You don’t have to suffer from anything in order to consume it, but you can take it as a preventive measure. There are no side effects, so it’s a completely safe remedy.
Ingredients
• 200 gr. of peeled and finely chopped ginger
• 50 gr. of organic honey
• 50 ml lime juice
• 450ml filtrated water
• Half a cup of sparkling water
Preparation
Boil the water, and add the finely chopped ginger. Cook on lower heat for five minutes. Put it aside and let it cool for around 20 minutes. Take another bowl to prepare the syrup. For this, you need to mix ½ a cup of the ginger water with the sparkling water. Then, stir in the honey and lime juice. Mix well and your miracle remedy is ready!
Across the world fermented foods are very popular. From sauerkraut to kimchi to kombucha, people have picked up on the benefits of making your foods in this fashion. But what are fermented foods? Well, they are foods that have been through a process of lacto fermentation in which natural bacteria feed on sugar and starch in the food creating lactic acid.
It takes some time to get it right so you have to be patient when making fermented snacks but, the wait is worth it. The process preserves these foods and creates high levels of beneficial enzymes, B vitamins, and various probiotics.
Ginger
One ingredient very popular in fermented foods for its many positive attributes is ginger. Known for reducing inflammation, and fighting cancer, ginger has many properties that make its addition to anything a great idea. First, ginger contains gingerol, the main bioactive compound responsible for it’s anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Second, ginger is ideal for treating any form of nausea. Third, ginger is known to combat high blood sugar and improve heart disease risk factors. Ginger is even known to lower levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein, bad cholesterol). And much more.
Let’s start exploring what the worlds of fermented foods and ginger have in common.
Ginger Bug
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Directions
Make sure your water is at room temperature, so the sugar will dissolve quickly and mix all the ingredients well. Cover with a napkin or paper towel and secure with a rubber band. Roughly every twenty-four hours, you should add all the ingredients listed above again. Don’t discard anything but keep adding. Make sure it’s aerated by stirring it occasionally.

After some time you should notice it getting bubbly. Double check that nothing is growing inside the container every now and then. By the end of the week, you’ve got yourself a ginger bug that you can add to a glass of water for a stomach settling drink.
Fermented ginger

Ingredients
• Ginger root, peeled and sliced
• 1 tablespoon Turmeric
• 1 tablespoon Sea salt
• Lemon Juice (enough to cover everything)
Directions
Soak your ginger in cold water for roughly 15 minutes then using a spoon gently scrape the skin off. The amount of ginger you use depends on the size of jar you’ve chosen. For a small jar use a ginger root roughly the size of your hand. But remember if you use a larger jar to adjust the amount of turmeric and sea salt used. Squeeze about five lemons to get enough to cover the ginger, then combine it all in a bowl until all is dissolved. The final step is to pour it all over your ginger in the jar and close it up air tight. Allow it to ferment at room temperature for about two weeks. Serve on the side of a dish but don’t cook them if you want the advantages of the lacto fermentation.
Fermented foods and your stomach
Because fermented foods offer a wide array of probiotics, eating them can help introduce beneficial bacteria into your digestive system and help balance it out bowel health. As a result of having a proper gut bacteria balance, your digestive enzymes will do a better job at absorbing your food, and you can focus less on using supplements to get the vitamins you need. The same probiotics have a profound effect on your immune system, aiding in the production of antibodies, boosting your defense against illness and disease.

Fermented foods are very popular across the world. People have picked up on the benefits of making your foods in this fashion from sauerkraut to kimchi to kombucha. But what are fermented foods? Well, they are foods that have been through a process of lacto fermentation in which natural bacteria feed on sugar and starch in the food creating lactic acid.
When making fermented snacks you have to be patient the wait is worth it. The process preserves these foods and creates high levels of B vitamins, beneficial enzymes and various probiotics.

Ginger
Ginger is one ingredient very popular in fermented foods for its many positive attributes. Despite reducing inflammation, and fighting cancer, ginger has many properties that make its addition to anything a great idea. Ginger contains bioactive compound gingerol responsible for it’s anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Also, ginger is ideal for treating any form of nausea. It is known to improve heart disease risk factors and combat high blood sugar, even lower levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein, bad cholesterol).
Let’s start exploring what the worlds of fermented foods and ginger have in common.
Ingredients:

2 tablespoons sugar (any whole-foods sugar)
1/2 cup filtered water
2 tablespoons ginger root, grated
a quart or 1/2 gallon-size jar (or other)
Preparation:
Make water have room temperature, so the sugar will dissolve quickly and mix all the ingredients well. With a napkin or paper towel cover and secure with a rubber band. Roughly every twenty-four hours, you should add all the ingredients listed above again. Don’t discard anything but keep adding. By stirring it occasionally make sure it’s aerated . You should notice it getting bubbly after some time. Double check that nothing is growing inside the container every now and then. You’ve got yourself a ginger bug by the end of the week, that you can add to a glass of water for a stomach settling drink.
Fermented ginger

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon Turmeric
1 tablespoon Sea salt
Lemon Juice (enough to cover everything)
Ginger root, peeled and sliced
Preparation:
In cold water for roughly 15 minutes soak your ginger then using a spoon gently scrape the skin off. The amount of ginger you use depends on the size of jar you’ve chosen. For a small jar use a ginger root roughly the size of your hand. But remember if you use a larger jar to adjust the amount of turmeric and sea salt used. About five lemons squeeze to get enough to cover the ginger, then combine it all in a bowl until all is dissolved. At the end pour it all over your ginger in the jar and close it up air tight. For about two weeks allow it to ferment at room temperature. Serve on the side of a dish but don’t cook them if you want the advantages of the lacto fermentation.

Fermented foods and your stomach
Eating them can help introduce beneficial bacteria into your digestive system and help balance it out bowel health because fermented foods offer a wide array of probiotics. Your digestive enzymes as a result of having a proper gut bacteria balance, will do a better job at absorbing your food, and you can focus less on using supplements to get the vitamins you need. The same probiotics have a profound effect on your immune system, boosting your defense against illness and disease, aiding in the production of antibodies.