If you pick your nose, you should probably stop now; this how dangerous it can be!

Most agree that nose-picking is an unseemly habit. But a casual observation of drivers (who seem to think no one can see them through clear glass) suggests that a lot of people pick when they believe no one’s watching.
Setting aside the shame of being busted knuckle-deep in nostril, can picking your nose hurt your health?
“Probably the number-one thing we worry about is digital trauma, which is a fancy name for bleeding related to picking,” says Dr. Brett Comer, a head and neck surgeon and assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Kentucky. The skin on the inside of the nose is more delicate than skin outside of it, and so more susceptible to damage, Comer says.
Once that damage occurs, the inside of the nose is also slow to repair itself. A scrape or cut inside the nostril will develop a crust or scab, which is irritating and takes a couple weeks to heal, Comer says. “You feel it, and you pick again, which reopens the wound and creates more scabbing, and so you keep picking,” he says. “It’s a vicious cycle.”
Picking-related infections are also a concern, says Dr. Vijay Ramakrishnan, an associate professor of otolaryngology at the University of Colorado. The undersides of fingernails are hotbeds for bacteria, and if a person’s picking is rough or frequent enough to abrade the skin inside the nose, any germs living on the fingertip or nail could make their way into that injury site. “Significant infections are rare,” Ramakrishnan says. But superficial infections, and even small pockets of bacteria-filled pus—known as abscesses—are not uncommon.
Sticking a finger in your nose can also make you sick. Germs that cause colds and flu need to make their way into your body in order to infect you, and your nostrils are among the few doorways that allow those microorganisms access to your insides. If you’ve been out and about all day—riding the subway, shopping, grabbing door handles—and you decide to jam your bacteria-coated finger in your nose, you might as well give your finger a lick while you’re at it.
In extreme cases, picking could even damage the nasal septum, which is the thin layer of cartilage separating your two nostrils, Ramakrishnan says. All-the-time picking can wear away the mucosal lining and underlying cartilage of the septum, opening a hole, he explains. His research has shown these sorts of septum perforations cause pain, nosebleeds and other symptoms, and are often hard to repair.
That said, nose-picking doesn’t exactly keep public health officials awake at night. But if social embarrassment isn’t enough to keep you from nose-mining, these health concerns are more good reasons to kick the habit.
What’s the best way to quit? Putting a bandage on your preferred picking digit may help you catch yourself before nostril penetration occurs. If your nose feels dry and irritated and these sensations make you want to pick, Comer recommends spritzing the insides of your nostrils with a saline spray and using a humidifier at night.
If you’re caught in the picking-bleeding-scabbing-picking cycle he mentioned above, Comer suggests swiping a little plain petroleum jelly on the irritated spot. That can help keep the area hydrated, and it should also aid healing. Trimming nose hairs can also cut down on irritation, and so help you resist the urge to pick.
While, in isolation, bogies might be the source of much amusement, picking your nose is something we can all agree is ‘frowned upon’.
As a child , you probably had your hand swatted away by a parent as you furtively tried to have a good pick.
It’s not uncommon to see children have a good nasal root around, but by the time we reach adulthood, the understanding is that we’ve grown out of it (or have become better at doing it in private).
There’s no official figure on how many adults occasionally have a quick pick, but our estimation would be ’99 per cent of them’.
But aside from the fact it’s seen as a bit gross and uncouth, IS having a surreptitious little pick such a bad thing?
Dangerous and even multi resistant bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus can get into your body. These germs live in your sinuses and you “feed” them every time you stick your finger in your nose.
Another complication: The nasal walls get irritated and can become chronically infected. Nose picking can injure the sensitive mucous membrane and cause bleeding.
Scabbing builds up and makes you want to scratch even more. This is how the viruses, bacteria, and fungi that are under your fingernails get into your bloodstream and make you sick.
Nose bleeds can be very severe because there are five arteries that run through the lower part of the nose! The sensitive mucous membrane in the nose can take several weeks to heal properly.
Who would have thought that such a harmless habit could be so bad for our health? So the next time you get the urge to do some booger mining, it might be better to reach for a tissue and blow your nose instead.
We all do it from time to time. We feel an itch or scratch and the next thing we know we’re sticking our fingers up our noses.
But did it ever occur to you that it might actually be dangerous? Read on to find out why you might want to think twice before going after that next booger…
Dangerous and even multiresistant bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus can get into your body. These germs live in your sinuses and you “feed” them every time you stick your finger in your nose.
Another complication: The nasal walls get irritated and can become chronically infected. Nose picking can injure the sensitive mucous membrane and cause bleeding.
Scabbing builds up and makes you want to scratch even more. This is how the viruses, bacteria, and fungi that are under your fingernails get into your bloodstream and make you sick.
Nose bleeds can be very severe because there are five arteries that run through the lower part of the nose! The sensitive mucous membrane in the nose can take several weeks to heal properly.
Who would have thought that such a harmless habit could be so bad for our health? So the next time you get the urge to do some booger mining, it might be better to reach for a tissue and blow your nose instead.
As an adult I read somewhere that picking your nose and eating it exposes you to germs and bacterium that is then broken down in the gut, which allows your immune system to develop antibodies to them.
This is my excuse and I am sticking with it.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/healt…
As a child I suppose I did it because my nose was blocked perhaps and I thought digging for a piece of green gold might have been a good way to clear it, perhaps mommy wouldn’t let me have a cookie and that’s all the edible matter I had access to.
Hell I still do it, I never stopped.
Why do I do it?
Why did I ever do it?
Also, sometimes you pick your nose with too much vigour and cause a bleed, this can cause black crunchy ones, which are a delicacy to me.
Bon Appetit!

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Not necessarily harmful and also not too much useful, either.
Blowing is much better.
Though, one should never squeeze pimples on the nose and upper lip (cavernous sinus thrombosis is lethal almost 100 percent).
I observe abscesses in the vestibulum of the nose (entrance to the nasal cavities) probably caused by nose picking. Never saw a cavernous sinus thrombosis because of that (yes, from squeezing pimples and infection of the upper teeth!).
So, in short, don’t…
Not as long as you follow these rules from an old pro (me!):
1. be sure to blow out through your nose first
2. be sure not to dig too deep, hence blowing air out one’s nostrils first so that the goo is dislodged from deep in your nasal cavity.
3. Wash your hands before and afterwards. The whole purpose of picking your nose is to clean it out so you can breath with clarity; without blockage or the germs from your fingers getting inside.
4. do it in a bathroom or in private!
and be sure to avoid a nosebleed. 🙂